laughingsquid:

Alfred Hitchcock Movies as Nintendo Games

CTG: This is just too much fun not to reblog

laughingsquid:

Alfred Hitchcock Movies as Nintendo Games

CTG: This is just too much fun not to reblog

(via npr)

Miles Under the Pacific, a Director Will take On His Most Risky Project
CTG: Love him or hate him, you have to respect him.
(image via: nytimes.com)

Miles Under the Pacific, a Director Will take On His Most Risky Project

CTG: Love him or hate him, you have to respect him.

(image via: nytimes.com)

"After 100 years, films should be getting really complicated. The novel has been reborn about 400 times, but it’s like cinema is stuck in the birth canal."
- Harmony Korine

"After 100 years, films should be getting really complicated. The novel has been reborn about 400 times, but it’s like cinema is stuck in the birth canal."

- Harmony Korine

Happy Birthday John Carpenter, 64 today.

Happy Birthday John Carpenter, 64 today.

Film Threat: Most of your films deal with various characters’ personal spirituality, yet you have never dealt directly with religion.
David Cronenberg: The reason why is that I’m not interested. You’re absolutely right. For me, it’s not even worth discussion. It doesn’t interest me. It interests me only to be discarded. If I start there, I’m mired in a discussion that is very unfruitful to me. I’m simply a non-believer and have been forever. To discuss religion is to put me in a debate with myself. I’m interested in saying, “Let us discuss the existential question. We are all going to die, that is the end of all consciousness. There is no afterlife. There is no God. Now what do we do.” That’s the point where it starts getting interesting to me. If I have to go back and say, “What if there is a God?” then I’m doing a debate that is not very interesting. You have to create one character who believes and another that doesn’t. It’s not an issue.
(excerpt from a 1997 Film Threat interview with Cronenberg)

Film Threat: Most of your films deal with various characters’ personal spirituality, yet you have never dealt directly with religion.

David Cronenberg: The reason why is that I’m not interested. You’re absolutely right. For me, it’s not even worth discussion. It doesn’t interest me. It interests me only to be discarded. If I start there, I’m mired in a discussion that is very unfruitful to me. I’m simply a non-believer and have been forever. To discuss religion is to put me in a debate with myself. I’m interested in saying, “Let us discuss the existential question. We are all going to die, that is the end of all consciousness. There is no afterlife. There is no God. Now what do we do.” That’s the point where it starts getting interesting to me. If I have to go back and say, “What if there is a God?” then I’m doing a debate that is not very interesting. You have to create one character who believes and another that doesn’t. It’s not an issue.

(excerpt from a 1997 Film Threat interview with Cronenberg)

“I hate the awards part of the moviemaking process. And besides, on The Social Network, I didn’t really agree with the critics’ praise. It interested me that Social Network was about friendships that dissolved through this thing that promised friendships, but I didn’t think we were ripping the lid off anything. The movie is true to a time and a kind of person, but I was never trying to turn a mirror on a generation.”
- David Fincher
CTG: I find this so interesting. As viewers and spectators we attach meaning to a narrative that the storyteller himself never intended. This is more common then we realize. We see what we want to see.

“I hate the awards part of the moviemaking process. And besides, on The Social Network, I didn’t really agree with the critics’ praise. It interested me that Social Network was about friendships that dissolved through this thing that promised friendships, but I didn’t think we were ripping the lid off anything. The movie is true to a time and a kind of person, but I was never trying to turn a mirror on a generation.”

- David Fincher

CTG: I find this so interesting. As viewers and spectators we attach meaning to a narrative that the storyteller himself never intended. This is more common then we realize. We see what we want to see.

Happy Birthday to one of the greats.

Happy Birthday to one of the greats.

"I don’t believe in sympathy, empathy, or happy endings."
- Todd Field

"I don’t believe in sympathy, empathy, or happy endings."

- Todd Field